Staycation in Cornwall: My Top 5 Moments

As a child, staycations were all I knew. Befriending sheepdogs in Devon, playing in the sand in Scarborough, seeking dinosaur fossils on the Isle of Wight – I had done it all by age ten and was itching to hop on a plane like many of my school mates had done.

Fast forward twenty years and countless plane rides later, and I’m back doing staycations. Going abroad is a lot of hassle at the moment due to COVID complications and restrictions, but thankfully the UK is home to so many beautiful places to explore. I had only really been to Cornwall as a child and it was definitely time to see its beautiful coastline again. Here are my top 5 moments from my staycation.

5. Discovering private beaches

They say Cornwall is overrun with visitors this year, but you can still find hidden gems and untouched pockets to explore – if you’re willing to scramble down a dodgy rope attached to a rock, that is. This beach is one of a handful on the coastal path from Lizard Point to Kynance Cove, and although some are inaccessible to most, if you’re up for a challenge you can make like Tarzan and climb down to escape the crowds and enjoy your own private beach.

4. Befriending farm animals

This one is a bit of a cheat because the adorable farm animals we were privileged to pet were actually on a two-night stopover in Somerset. Set within the stunning Exmoor National Park on the border between Somerset and Devon, our Airbnb was home to horses, sheep, lambs and chickens, plus a semi-feral cat called Lettuce, and Wanaka, a sweet old Labrador. They were an obvious highlight for any animal lover.

3. Jumping into the sea on a coasteering adventure

If only I had a GoPro, I would have some wild videos and pictures of me jumping from the Cornish cliffs into the sea, scrambling on rocks and swimming in crystal clear waters – but an image of Fristral Beach, just round the corner from our adventure – will have to do. Newquay is home to some of the best watersports activities in the UK, and many come from all over the country to surf on its perfect waters. We tried coasteering which was brave considering we didn’t even really know what it was till we were doing it! After donning flattering wet suits, shorts and helmets, we took off with a small group of eight and our brilliant guide Katie, and jumped off rocks that edged higher and higher from the sea on an exhilarating two-hour coasteering experience.

2. Hiking the coastal path from Lizard Point to Kynance Cove

Lizard Point is the most southerly part of mainland England, and the coastal path that snakes along the rugged coastline to Kynance Cove is simply beautiful. We caught it on one of the most perfect summer days – 26 degree heat – and the 45-60 minute walk took us over two hours as we admired the views of seals in the sea and explored little pebble coves. The closer we got to Kynance Cove – known as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world – the busier it got, and although the cove itself was stunning, it was much more crowded than anywhere else we’d been on our trip. We couldn’t resist a quick dip in the fairly freezing sea though, before taking the trail back.

1. The freedom of seeing it all on a motorbike

This whole trip was done on two wheels – on my boyfriend’s motorbike. Including all the stops and different places we visited across Somerset, Devon and Cornwall, our ride from London saw us cover around 700 miles. I am a bit of a novice when it comes to being a pillion passenger on a bike, but it was extremely fun (despite the achy bum) and was the best way to explore everything. Skipping traffic, getting into car parks for free and just the general freedom of being on a motorbike during one of the hottest weeks of the year were just some of the reasons why it was perfect.

By Alice Bzowska

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